Inside thoughts

August 12th, 2016 No comments

What a Healthy Weight Loss Plan Really Looks Like

By Ruth Frechman, MA, RDN, CPT

Woman weighing herself - What a Healthy Weight Loss Plan Really Looks Like

Jose Luis Pelaez Inc/Blend Images/Thinkstock

For individuals looking to lose weight, following a very low calorie diet may result in rapid weight loss in the short term, but slow and steady wins the weight loss race. The most successful weight loss plans combine diet, exercise and behavioral therapy. Talking to a registered dietitian nutritionist is a good first step. Learn more about proven pills.

Identify the Problem Areas

Every person has a different situation, so the approach to losing weight depends on the individual. The first step is to identify what’s going on. Are you doing something that is making weight gain more likely? Some of these behaviors may include:

  • Eating too many foods and beverages with added sugars and solid fats
  • Eating big portions
  • Skipping meals
  • Eating a lot of meals away from home
  • Grazing all day on high-calorie snacks
  • Frequently drinking high-calorie drinks
  • Consuming too much alcohol
  • Eating for emotional reasons
  • Eating in front of a screen such as mobile device or television

Make Changes

Ultimately, the best way to lose weight is to change the habits that are causing the extra weight. For the best results, pick one habit at a time to change. For example, try limiting sweets and treats, cutting out fried foods or only eating out once a week. Replace those old habits with new habits, such as trying new fruits and vegetables or a new exercise routine. Check out the latest resurge reviews.

Keep Track

Studies show that people who self-monitor their meals lose more weight and keep it off. The most successful “losers” tend to weigh themselves about once a week.

Put It All Together

If you want to achieve your weight-loss goals, tracking your food intake and conducting regular weigh-ins are practical lifestyle-based methods for losing weight. A registered dietitian nutritionist can help you reach your individual weight goals and serve as a support.

Categories: Opinion, update Tags:

Current editor issues in Unity 5

April 3rd, 2015 17 comments

Unity-5-logo

First, let me make something clear: I love Unity. I use it every day and it allows me to build my dream game. So don’t take anything I’m about to say as “oh you just don’t like Unity”. I love it to bits; it’s a fantastic tool.

Now that this caveat is out of the way, let’s dig into things which, from my point of view, ought to be addressed. Keep in mind that I spend an ungodly amount of time using Unity to create Ghost of a Tale. So anything that breaks my workflow is really frustrating to me.

As you’ll see those issues are mostly geared towards ergonomic and manipulation of game objects in the editor. To be fair, they don’t strike newcomers; they only become a hindrance for experienced users who rely on every little thing to make their development life easier.

Still, I don’t think that should detract from their pertinence. So here they are, in no particular order:

 

1) No lateral slider in hierarchy window:

If you need to dig into a complex hierarchy of game objects, you actually have to resize Unity’s window layout. Try to imagine Maya without a lateral slider in its outliner and you get the idea.

 

2) No drag-and-drop component reordering:

You can click and drag a component directly from one game object (in the inspector) to another game object (in the hierarchy window), but you can’t simply click-and-drag a component up or down on the same game object.

This means tediously clicking dozens of times just to move a newly added component to the top of a long components list.

 

3) No way to make an object unselectable in the scene view:

In any 3D application it is very important to see some items while not being able to interact with them by mistake. We need a way to mark some game objects as visible but unselectable in the scene view (while still being able to select them in the hierarchy of course).

 

4) Lack of true labeling system:

There’s no proper labeling system in Unity. Only tags. And only one tag per game object. No way to tell an item it is “Ground”, “Rock”, “Cold”. It can only be one thing.

That’s a big limitation. Being able to set and get game objects’ labels would be a tremendous advantage for development and gameplay purposes.

 

5) Base selection is not working:

[BaseSelection] is a simple line of code you can add within a component script to make a group (a hierarchy of game objects) behave like a prefab.

It’s super useful as not everything can be one unique prefab; sometimes you want an empty game object housing a couple of prefabs without actually turning the whole thing into a prefab.

So adding that line makes clicking anything in that group select the root node; same behavior as a prefab without actually being a prefab! Super cool stuff.

Except it’s broken. Basically it only behaves as expected during game mode. But if there are prefabs within the group then it doesn’t work outside of game mode (which defeats the purpose). If you want to read more information about the latest games on the market you should visit this website.

 

6) Number appended at the end of a duplicated game object:

This is kind of a recent behavior in Unity. At first I thought of it as a mere annoyance; Unity started renaming copies of duplicated game objects (prefabs or not) by appending a number to the copies’ name.

One thing to know: in Unity it’s never a good idea to rename a prefab in the scene. It’s perfectly possible, but not very wise.

Because if you do, then you’re never quite sure of which was the original prefab’s name. So you need to click on Select to select the prefab on disk to be certain that it’s the right one. Quite cumbersome.

And now, since Unity adds numbers to the name of a duplicated prefab, if you hit “Apply” on that prefab copy, the original prefab (the one on the disk, without the number in the name) will be affected. Without being renamed of course.

And once again renaming prefabs in the hierarchy and “unpairing” them from their original name is asking for trouble. I think this was implemented thinking it would help the user but that’s just not the case. There should at least be a way of opting out of this automatic behavior.

Update: I have stopped worrying and learned to love the numbers-at-the-end. More seriously Unity now uses “(1)” whenever you duplicate a game object and at least it visually stands out. The discrepancy between the original prefab name and the object name remains, but I guess I can live with it.

 

7) Game objects jumping places in the hierarchy:

Unity fairly recently introduced a new concept of hierarchy sorting, which is really neat. Basically, things are not sorted out by alphabetical order anymore. It means a game object stays where you put it in the scene’s hierarchy.

As I said, really neat. Except it’s still not working properly. Game objects (mainly prefabs) keep changing places when you save a scene, close Unity and reopen it. Which is tedious when you do this often.

Edit: I’ve now changed my way of working to bypass that bug and I don’t use prefabs at the scene’s root level anymore. So I don’t deal with that annoyance anymore.

 

8) Scene camera teleporting while Unity loads textures:

When moving through the scene view Unity will freeze once in a while to load up textures when a mesh with new textures enters frustum. Which is perfectly understandable.

The real problem though, is that the WASD + right-click input detection of the scene camera does not get notified of the freeze. Meaning that if the texture takes a second to load, then -when you get control back- your camera has actually teleported way away in the last direction before the freeze happened. Just as if you had kept moving at full speed in that direction for a second.

This aggravation would be gone if the editor’s movement input routine would just get suspended while the editor loads the new textures and until actual control is given back to the user.

 

9) No way to get the members of a layer:

A command like FindGameObjectsWithinLayers() would be extremely useful as there is currently no way to get the list of gameObjects contained within a layer. Which forces us to rely exclusively on using FindGameObjectsWithTags (cf. point 4 for limitations of the Tag system).

(Edit: I’m aware of the solution proposed here but while it does eventually let you find the members of a layer by recursively iterating through every game object in the scene and checking if their layer is the one you’re interested in, it can’t really be considered an efficient solution)

 

10) No way to access inactive game objects via code in an editor tool:

Let’s say you have deactivated game objects in your scene, at root level, and you want to access them via code for an editor-only tool? That’s not possible.

You could of course list all the game objects in the scene and find out which ones do not have a parent and are inactive, but that means you then have to manually filter internal Unity objects corresponding to that criteria by name like “” (whatever that one is!), “PreviewMaterials”, “HandlesGO”, etc… And that is a really dirty and dangerous way to do things. Especially when the goal is to manipulate (or even destroy) those objects.

There is a need for a command (or a flag) to find deactivated game objects (at least in the editor if not in-game).

Edit: There is actually an undocumented command called HierarchyProperty(HierarchyType.GameObjects) which will return a list of hierarchy-only objects including inactive game objects (as mentioned here: http://answers.unity3d.com/questions/27729/finding-the-root-gameobjects-in-the-scene-.html). Thanks to Thomas for the heads up!

 

Finally, please let me know if you can think of anything else or if you’re aware of a way to bypass any of those limitations.

And if I’m actually wrong about any of those points, do let me know! My goal is not to crack down on Unity but rather to streamline my workflow; so if any of these can be taken off the list I’m more than glad to do it! :)

Categories: Unity, update Tags:

Ghost of a Tale screenshot

February 22nd, 2015 No comments

Damn, it’s been a long time since I’ve last posted here! Of course nowadays Ghost of a Tale takes me most of my time. The workload is huge but the satisfaction of developing something personal makes it all worth the effort… :)

Here’s a WIP screenshot of the courtyard you get to discover once you escape your cell.

ScreenShot 2015_02_14 12;23;41001

And if anyone’s interested in following the game’s development, please head on to www.ghostofatale.com

 

Categories: "Ghost of a Tale", Unity Tags:

Thoughts about The Last of Us

September 21st, 2013 No comments

ScreenShot033_1

Spoiler Warning: This post discusses the game’s ending!!!

I finished The Last of Us a couple of months ago and I have to say the production values are way up there; this is excellent work in every department!

But I want to talk a little about the ending. You see, what happened while I was playing it is that I died (like I did many times during the course of the game), but the way that cut-scene was longer than the others and very well staged, I thought it was the REAL ending.

And I was floored. It totally worked for me. Joel was carrying an unconscious Ellie, desperately looking for a door that would lead them outside to freedom. But the armed guards were close behind them; I could hear their voices. The desperation of Joel was palpable, the tension so high. Until finally the guards caught up top to Joel and threw him to the ground. It was chaotic; Joel was thrashing, shouting through his tears for the guards not to take Ellie away. And then one of the guards put his gun to Joel’s head. The gunshot sound boomed and the screen went dark. It was over.

I was speechless. It was a perfect ending in my opinion; Joel stayed true to himself until the end. He wanted to save Ellie, but also to keep her for himself. For very understandable selfish reasons. It was a desperate gesture but it made sense. While the armed forces were too much for him; there was no doubt in my mind that they would manage to stop Joel and snatch Ellie. The odds were too much. Yes, the two protagonists had died, but humanity stood a chance, thanks to Ellie’s sacrifice. Dark. Tragic. Yet also hopeful.

But I guess it’s a little like Blade Runner’s “true” ending; it was probably too much to stomach for people and instead Joel makes it out and his (and Ellie’s) life goes on. Not the ending I would have chosen. Still, that’s one utterly brilliant game.

Categories: rant, update Tags:

I lost 35 pounds in 6 months without going on a diet, and it taught me 7 lessons about eating for healthy fat loss

September 21st, 2013 2 comments

Losing weight is, in theory, simple. But that doesn’t make it easy.

The vast majority of people, and women in particular, are always trying, or at the very least wishing, to lose some weight, no matter how much, for health or aesthetic reasons.

If it were as easy as it appears on paper — that is, take in less energy than you’re burning — the multibillion-dollar diet industry wouldn’t exist.

Whether it’s a reality-TV star peddling a bikini blitz workout DVD, an influencer plugging laxative teas, or a tabloid claiming to have come up with a diet plan that will see you losing 10 pounds in a week, supposed quick fixes are everywhere, because we all love the idea of putting in minimal effort and getting results fast.

But the truth is, none of these things work. There is no shortcut, and anything that results in rapid weight loss won’t be healthy or sustainable. You didn’t gain 10 pounds in a week, so how could you possibly lose it that quickly?

before after side rachel hosie
January to June 2019. 

Rachel Hosie

Over the past five months, I’ve lost nearly 35 pounds, or over 15 kilos.

Like many, my weight has fluctuated over my adult life, but at the end of 2018 I was the biggest and heaviest I’d ever been. I felt sluggish, hated shopping, and barely fit into any of my clothes (smocks were life), but I don’t think I realized quite how much weight I’d gained until I had a body scan at the end of November.

I’d put on 11 pounds, or 5 kilos, since I’d last weighed myself the previous July, and seeing the number on the scale was the wake-up call I needed.

Read more: A bad diet could cause more deaths than smoking, according to a major new study

There’s nothing wrong with gaining weight if you’re healthy, but I wasn’t, and my weight gain was a reflection of the fact that I wasn’t looking after myself.

The weight had crept up over the years, as it so often does. I will always love to eat and drink, but as a 20-something living in London, I’d lost all concept of moderation or balance, regularly binge-drinking and overeating.

My diet wasn’t necessarily unhealthy, and I was very active, but I was simply consuming far too much, frequently eating to the point of pain.

Losing weight wasn’t my main incentive, but it was part of the overall lifestyle switch I’ve successfully made. And that’s what’s made this time different to every other time I’ve lost a few pounds.

before after front rachel hosie
January to June 2019: My body shrank while my chest of drawers grew. 

Rachel Hosie

It was time to start putting myself, my health, and my happiness first. No restrictive plans, no strict rules, no thinking of myself as being on a diet, but rather approaching it as a journey toward creating a healthier, happier, sustainable lifestyle. Take a look to the latest blast auxiliary ac reviews.

And it worked.

As a lifestyle journalist with a focus on health, food, wellness, and fitness, I was already well informed about how to live a healthy lifestyle. But there’s still so much I’ve learned this year, from how to train to how to deal with saboteurs (both separate articles entirely).

But perhaps the most important changes I’ve made have been regarding my diet. So here are seven lessons I’ve learned about how to eat to lose weight sustainably.

1. Cutting out foods just results in bingeing.

rachel hosie pudding.JPG
Everyone needs a dessert from time to time. 

Rachel Hosie

Cutting bread, sugar, or anything else you enjoy out of your diet is not a good idea as you’ll only end up bingeing on it. Do you want to cut those delicious foods out forever? Didn’t think so.

While you may think you “can’t do” moderation (stopping after a few squares of chocolate and not eating the whole bar), you can if you stop demonizing the food. There’s no such thing as “good” and “bad” foods, although, yes, there are more and less nutrient-dense foods. For more information visit westword.com.

For me, it’s also helped to think of foods in terms of macros — are they a source of protein, carbs, or fats? So a bar of chocolate is a carb, just like a banana or oats, and they can all be part of a healthy diet.

Read more: I tried to eat healthily while ordering all my meals from food-delivery apps for a week

If you love doughnuts, you don’t have to give them up forever to lose weight, and this can make them easier to resist when your colleague brings in a box of Krispy Kremes — you know what they taste like, you’ll eat doughnuts at a later point in your life, you don’t need to eat one just because they’re there. But at the same time, if you really want a doughnut, just eat one and enjoy it!

If you feel like you’re punishing yourself, it’s never going to work.

2. Working out won’t result in fat loss if you don’t also address your diet.

rachel hosie gym.JPG
Exercise is great, but working out alone won’t result in fat loss. 

Rachel Hosie

Before I changed my lifestyle, I already worked out four to five times a week, doing a mixture of weight-lifting, dance classes, and netball. I was also active in my day-to-day life, walking at least 14,000 steps a day. But I was still overweight.

The past six months have shown me how much truth there is in the adage, “You can’t out-train a bad diet.” Or, more specifically, a diet that simply involves consuming too much. This is how biofit works.

Working out is great for you in so many ways, and it certainly helps the fat-loss process (more on that another time), but if you think exercise alone is going to see your weight dropping off, you may be disappointed.

3. Upping your protein intake will help a lot.

chicken salad avocado.JPG

Erin Brodwin / Business Insider

It’s a complete myth that eating for fitness means plain chicken and broccoli with a protein shake on the side for every meal, but it’s true that keeping your protein intake up is important.

In fact, studies have shown that following a high-protein diet can help maintain muscle and boost metabolism, keep you feeling full when trying to lose weight, and reduce hunger.

“Eating a sufficient amount of protein when you’re losing weight is paramount in order to preserve lean muscle mass,” specialist registered dietitian Nichola Ludlam-Raine told INSIDER.

“Eating around 1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight,” she said, “alongside resistance exercise, helps to maintain both muscle strength and metabolic rate” — the rate at which your body burns calories. “The digestion of protein also requires more calories in comparison to carbs and fat, and help to keep you feeling full too.”

Categories: rant, update Tags:

INDIEGOGO JUST EXTENDED THE CAMPAIGN BY ONE WEEK!!!!!!

May 6th, 2013 3 comments

This is incredible, guys! Indiegogo has just pushed back the deadline for the “Ghost of a Tale” campaign by one week in order to help it reach its goal!

This is absolutely amazing! I don’t know if you realize but something like that NEVER HAPPENS!!!

It’s worth all the Crystal Crabs in the world! :)

Categories: "Ghost of a Tale", campaign, update Tags:

Character Sneak Peek: Frog

April 29th, 2013 No comments

So you thought the only “life” form on the Island of Periclave was the undead garrison of the Rat King? Think again… :)

The island is located in the middle of the great Lake Vaelias and the frogs have lived there for a very long time, despising the wars of the Hairy Ones with all their disgusting ears and tails.

When the rats built their citadel the frogs were driven back to their underwater caves and temple. But now… Now something has happened on the island.

… But, well, all this won’t matter if the campaign for “Ghost of a Tale” doesn’t reach its goal of course.

Categories: "Ghost of a Tale", campaign, Unity, update Tags: